An indefinite sense of uneasiness

Let us suppose, for instance the existence of a being, furnished with human organs of sensation, but with no power of remembering or reflecting upon the objects presented to them, and no continuance of any impression beyond the moment of its actual presence. It is probable that, in such a case, though diverse objects might … Continue reading An indefinite sense of uneasiness

To have a complete consciousness

In every complete act of consciousness offered to us for analysis, the presentative and representative elements are combined; and without such a combination it would appear as if consciousness, properly so called, could have no existence. To have a complete consciousness, for example, of any particular object of sense, say of an oak-tree, two conditions … Continue reading To have a complete consciousness

Presentative and representative consciousness

It is sufficient for our present purpose to state, that whatever occupies a distinct portion of space, however arbitrarily distinguished, is an individual object of external intuition; and whatever occupies a distinct moment of time, without extension in space, is an individual object of internal intuition. On the other hand, general notions or concepts, as … Continue reading Presentative and representative consciousness

Time is to individual phenomena of mind

The individual is thus the ultimate object of all actual consciousness; in intuition directly, and in thought indirectly. To complete our explanation, we must therefore determine what is meant by an individual. By the term an individual is meant, in psychology, no more than an object occupying a definite position in space or time. It … Continue reading Time is to individual phenomena of mind

The ultimate object of all consciousness

The same distinction is applicable to mental as well as to bodily phenomena. I feel an emotion of anger; I am conscious of its presence now, as a definite state of mind distinguishable from others. This consciousness is presentative. When the angry fit is over, I meditate upon my past state, and recall in imagination … Continue reading The ultimate object of all consciousness

Consciousness, in its relation to the subject

Consciousness, in its relation to the subject or person conscious, is of two kinds or rather, is composed of two elements—the presentative or intuitive, and the representative or reflective. The phenomena of the former class maybe distinguished by the general name of Intuitions; those of the latter by that of Thoughts. Presentative or intuitive consciousness … Continue reading Consciousness, in its relation to the subject

The facts of consciousness

Physical science does not trouble itself with the inquiry, whether the objects which it investigates are real or apparent; qualities of matter or modes of the spectator’s own mind; whether they are gained directly or indirectly; by innate or acquired powers, by one faculty of the mind alone or by the union of many. Its … Continue reading The facts of consciousness

The whole cycle of human knowledge

The study of the master-minds of the human race is almost equally instructive in what they achieved and in what they failed to achieve; and speculations which are far from solving the riddle of existence have their use in teaching us why it is insoluble. Thus it appears that the term Metaphysics has been at … Continue reading The whole cycle of human knowledge

The cause of change

A short analysis of the principal subjects treated of in the Metaphysics of Aristotle will serve to exhibit the details of the former method, as far as our present limits will permit, the unchanging principle of all change and motion. Sensible substances, the objects of physical science, are subject to change; and all change implies … Continue reading The cause of change

What is the relation of self-evidence to reality?

As the metaphysical writings of Aristotle and his followers are likely to be but little known to the majority of modern readers, it may be useful to add a brief account of the ancient method of treating the subject, which will serve at the same time to exhibit more clearly the chasm which separates the … Continue reading What is the relation of self-evidence to reality?

The laws of things and the laws of thought

If Aristotle for a moment grasped the important truth, that the laws of things and the laws of thought were alike objects of metaphysical inquiry, the conviction produced hardly any result in the details of his treatment: his psychology allied itself chiefly to physics: his metaphysics, after its introductory chapter, deserted the track of psychology. … Continue reading The laws of things and the laws of thought

The hidden element of reality

The problem has thus a twofold aspect, as related to the conditions of being and to the conditions of thought; and its solution may be attempted from the one or the other starting-point. We may commence with abstract principles of being in general, and endeavour to deduce & priori the essential characteristics of existence per … Continue reading The hidden element of reality

The Philosophy of Consciousness

Metaphysics has been defined by Aristotle (and the definition may be for the present provisionally accepted) as the science which contemplates being as being, and the attributes which belong to it as such. The latter definition, while verbally resembling the former, exhibits, in fact, an important modification of it; for it implies that the progress … Continue reading The Philosophy of Consciousness

Phenomenon of Consciousness (18)

We cannot by volition prevent the sensory nerves from transmitting the impulses caused by external relations. For example, we cannot by volition prevent hearing a sound. But these actions may be guided, stimulated and concentrated by volition. If there are several simultaneous sound relations in progress in a room occupied by a listener, he may … Continue reading Phenomenon of Consciousness (18)

Phenomenon of Consciousness (17)

And in these involuntary knockings we have, therefore, an ample potential cause for the genesis of conscious states. But if the cerebrum is not completely or sufficiently rejuvenated when these knockings come, it will resist their untimely intrusion, will resist throwing off the oblivious state. The knocking must be repeated, continued and must perhaps become … Continue reading Phenomenon of Consciousness (17)

Phenomenon of Consciousness (16)

We have already seen that neither the brain record alone nor any existing internal relations of the cerebrum at a particular time or at any time, by voluntary or involuntary action, could generate or bring into activity a power of cognition without a stimulus to brain activity. How, then, does it originate ? We have … Continue reading Phenomenon of Consciousness (16)

Phenomenon of Consciousness (14)

Consciousness, instead of being essential to living bodies, is never even persistent in any living body. It is invariably an intermittent or periodic phenomenon and any tendency toward persistence is generally, if not always, detrimental or destructive to the organism. The average period of consciousness of living animals is about twelve hours, followed normally by … Continue reading Phenomenon of Consciousness (14)

Phenomenon of Consciousness (13)

It appears from this jumble of the imaginary, hypothetical and concrete that the mind is the soul; that it is energy, force and matter and at the same time not matter; that the soul is the disembodied spirit; that the spirit is the disembodied soul while residing in the body and after leaving the body; … Continue reading Phenomenon of Consciousness (13)

Phenomenon of Consciousness (12)

Whatever the mind may be, it is not the brain, and cognitions are undoubtedly either the acts or phenomena resulting from acts of the brain, or of the brain in conjunction with other parts of the living body. There is no doubt that cognitions depend entirely upon the operations of the living body and that … Continue reading Phenomenon of Consciousness (12)

Phenomenon of Consciousness (10)

The phenomenon of consciousness has already been defined as the cognition or knowledge of the existence of self and of the Universe. The word also defines, as previously stated, a certain state or condition of the brain, in which the brain has this power of cognition of self-existence and of other simultaneous cognitions. This phenomenon … Continue reading Phenomenon of Consciousness (10)

Phenomenon of Consciousness (9)

All attempts heretofore made to account for the origin or existence of the Universe involve such contradictions or ambiguities. No rational account can be given of any phenomenon without previously accepting the existence of the physical universe as made known to consciousness through sense and cognition. A theory based on a mathematical space of four … Continue reading Phenomenon of Consciousness (9)

Phenomenon of Consciousness (8)

Every change is, therefore, A process in which energy acts UPON matter in space during time. The most complicated change is nothing more and the simplest is nothing less. Energy, matter, space and time, being necessary and sufficient for every change capable of cognition, constitute the physical elements of the Universe. The study of these … Continue reading Phenomenon of Consciousness (8)

Phenomenon of Consciousness (7)

What constitutes change? Change, as it is manifested through the organs of sense and interpreted by the power of cognition, consists in a difference between successive states of what we call the universe. We usually think of change as a change in matter. This is probably because matter, mass or substance is the vehicle through … Continue reading Phenomenon of Consciousness (7)

Phenomenon of Consciousness (6)

The physical Universe presents itself to cognition or consciousness as a continuous succession of conditions produced by change. Change is everywhere and incessant. The sum total of human knowledge is knowledge of continuous change in the present and recollection or memory of change in the past. All supposed knowledge of the future is not knowledge. … Continue reading Phenomenon of Consciousness (6)

Phenomenon of Consciousness (5)

There are, therefore, two distinct kinds or classes of cognitions: those stimulated or produced by external relations transferred into correlative internal relations within the brain through the organs of sense, that is, cognitions originating in energy transmitted by the organs of sense; and those stimulated or produced by internal relations already existing within the brain, … Continue reading Phenomenon of Consciousness (5)

Phenomenon of Consciousness (3)

The same is true of words spoken in the same room with the hearer, even spoken directly into the ear. No external word, no external sound, ever reaches the brain. There is no external sound. The only sounds ever heard in any brain are cognitions originating and existing only in the brain—cognitions of internal relations … Continue reading Phenomenon of Consciousness (3)

Phenomenon of Consciousness (1)

Two MEN Stand with their faces toward the setting sun. One has the ordinary power of vision, the other is blind. To the one there appears a beautiful phenomenon, to the other, nothing. Both are facing the same juxtaposition of elements,—energy, matter, space and time, which constitutes the sunset sky. To the one there is … Continue reading Phenomenon of Consciousness (1)

Consciousness (7)

In this form the question is unanswerable, for it is founded on false premises. The Perfect is the All, the Totality, the Sum of Being. Within its infinity, as above said, is everything contained, every potentiality, as well as actuality, of existence. All that has been, is, will be, can be, ever is in that … Continue reading Consciousness (7)

Consciousness (6)

In matter far subtler than the physical—as mind-stuff—the creative power of consciousness is more readily seen than in the dense material of the physical plane. Matter becomes dense or rare, and changes its combinations and forms, according to the thoughts of a consciousness active therein. While the fundamental atoms—due to the Logic thought—remain unchanged, they … Continue reading Consciousness (6)

Consciousness (5)

Consciousness dealing with a definite time, however long or short, with a definite space, however vast or restricted, is individual, that of a concrete Being, a Lord of many universes, or some universes, or a universe, or of any so-called portion of a universe, his portion and to him therefore a universe—these terms varying as … Continue reading Consciousness (5)

Consciousness (4)

To say this is not to materialise consciousness, but only to recognise the fact that the two primary opposites, consciousness and matter, are straightly bound together, are never apart, not even in the highest Being. Matter is limitation, and without limitation consciousness is not. So far from materialising consciousness, it puts it as a concept … Continue reading Consciousness (4)

Consciousness (2)

This leads us to our next point: the existence of consciousness implies a lion into two aspects of the fundamental all-underlying Unity. The modern name of consciousness, " awareness," equally implies this. For you cannot hang up awareness in the void: awareness implies something of which it is aware, a duality at the least. Otherwise … Continue reading Consciousness (2)

Consciousness (1)

The Meaning of the Word. Let us now consider what we mean by consciousness, and see if this consideration will build for us the much longed-for "bridge," which is the despair of modern thought, between consciousness and matter, will span for us the "gulf" alleged to exist for ever between them. To begin with a … Continue reading Consciousness (1)

Thought Forms (9)

Perhaps the supreme example of a thought-form is that known in the Christian Church as the Angel of the Presence. This is not a member of the kingdom of the Angels, but a thought-form of the Christ, wearing His likeness and being an extension of the consciousness of the Christ Himself. It is by means … Continue reading Thought Forms (9)

Thought Forms (8)

There is, however, a type of clairvoyance rather more advanced than ordinary clairvoyance, necessitating a certain amount of control upon the mental plane. It is necessary to retain so much hold over a newly created thought-form as will render it possible to receive impressions by means of it. Such impressions as were made upon the … Continue reading Thought Forms (8)

Thought Waves (3)

A thought-wave or vibration thus conveys the character of the thought, but not its subject. If a Hindu sits wrapped in devotion to Krishna, the thought-waves which pour forth from him stimulate devotion in all those who come under their influence, though in the case of a Muslim, that devotion to Allah, while for the … Continue reading Thought Waves (3)

The Mental Plane (11)

Let us now consider, in this light, the relations between the higher and lower mind and their action on the brain. The mind, Manas, the Thinker is one, and is the Self in the causal body; it is the source of innumerable energies, of vibrations of innumerable kinds. These it sends out, raying outwards from … Continue reading The Mental Plane (11)

The Mental Plane (10)

A very little reflection will convince anyone how little material, suitable for the growth of this lofty body, he affords by his daily life; hence the slowness of evolution, the little progress made. The Thinker should have more of himself to put out in each successive life, and, when this is the case, evolution goes … Continue reading The Mental Plane (10)

The Mental Plane (7)

We have seen that the mental body is so closely mingled with the astral, that they act as a single body, but the dawning mental faculties add to the astral passions a certain strength and quality not apparent in them when they work as purely animal qualities. The impressions made on the mental body are … Continue reading The Mental Plane (7)