Phenomenon of Consciousness (18)

We cannot by volition prevent the sensory nerves from transmitting the impulses caused by external relations. For example, we cannot by volition prevent hearing a sound. But these actions may be guided, stimulated and concentrated by volition. If there are several simultaneous sound relations in progress in a room occupied by a listener, he may … Continue reading Phenomenon of Consciousness (18)

Phenomenon of Consciousness (17)

And in these involuntary knockings we have, therefore, an ample potential cause for the genesis of conscious states. But if the cerebrum is not completely or sufficiently rejuvenated when these knockings come, it will resist their untimely intrusion, will resist throwing off the oblivious state. The knocking must be repeated, continued and must perhaps become … Continue reading Phenomenon of Consciousness (17)

Phenomenon of Consciousness (16)

We have already seen that neither the brain record alone nor any existing internal relations of the cerebrum at a particular time or at any time, by voluntary or involuntary action, could generate or bring into activity a power of cognition without a stimulus to brain activity. How, then, does it originate ? We have … Continue reading Phenomenon of Consciousness (16)

Phenomenon of Consciousness (15)

Hence, we are almost driven to accept the pituitary and pineal glandular bodies as the separate organs, which separately produce the two necessary reagents, they being the only glandular bodies whose position would enable them to perform this function. This hypothesis is substantially supported by the position of these organs in the center of the … Continue reading Phenomenon of Consciousness (15)